Month: September 2017

How Baby Safety Technology is Outgrowing Its Infancy – Inc.com

Technology

How Baby Safety Technology is Outgrowing Its Infancy – Inc.com

Innovation solves real world problems. In the real world, people have babies, as well as careers. They need solutions that make their lives easier and their homes safer for themselves and their infants. This year, five of my executive friends had their first babies and after visiting their newly decked out nurseries I noticed how increasingly high-tech being a new parent has become!

The baby safety tech industry has seen a lot of new growth and innovation in recent years, according to TechNavio. But it’s not an area that fosters reckless growth and development. Facebook’s old slogan “Move fast and break things” would never work for this sensitive, highly regulated, industry. Unfortunately for baby safety tech innovators, improvements usually move forward in baby steps.

So, if you can’t move fast and break things, how do you innovate?

First, you have to meet a need. Necessity, after all, is well known as the mother of invention. Sometimes there isn’t a need to be met until the right person comes along and asks “how can we fix this through technology?”

That’s what happened with Arturas Vaitaitis, creator of an innovative sleep monitor called Monbaby. As a new father, Vaitaitis was personally motivated to get a good night’s sleep, and to rest easy about his baby’s safety during the night. He needed some assurance that his baby was breathing without having to touch the child and risk waking him up.

Vaitaitis helped launch the design for MonBaby, a clip-on monitor that sends data about your baby’s breathing, position, temperature, etc. directly to your iPhone or Android device. The company aggregates data that allows comparative analytics, which can be seen by parents on a dashboard. They also get a history of the quality of the child’s sleep vs. the rest of the client database.

Vaitaitis and his teammates designed it to use Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) technology, which doesn’t rely on a WIFI connection. They also made sure it’s the most affordable connectable baby monitoring product on the market right now.

This makes it useful for people in parts of the world where WIFI isn’t a given, and where other clip-on monitors are out of the reach for the average family. MonBaby is meeting needs for many people and their journey can teach us quite a lot about the innovation process. Here are some of their insights.

You’re Not Alone

If you’ve got a need unfulfilled in your life, one that might be fixed through innovative technology, you probably aren’t the only one. It’s likely that people all over the world would benefit from an innovative solution.

Collaborative research from ForbesWoman and TheBump.com showed that 92 percent of working mothers say between work, home and parenting responsibilities, they’re feeling overwhelmed. Let’s look at that figure again. 92 percent! That’s a pretty high rate. And it expresses a lot of need.

Any time there’s a demand arising in volumes like this, that’s an immediate signal that it’s time to innovate. If you want to get really creative, set aside all of your ideas scribbled on napkins and instead, reverse engineer a creative solution starting with the problem. Analyze the need and ask “how can we solve this using technology?”

Focus on the Problem to Reverse Engineer a Solution

It may be a problem that you’re passionate about or personally invested in, like Vaitaitis. In other cases, it won’t be. It could just be an inconvenience that a lot of the world is experiencing, or a need for which a solution could be especially timely and helpful.

As the MonBaby’s team told me, “The underlying drive behind all of this is to help people. We started with parents and their newborn babies. However, our aim is to help many of those who are in need of assistance through wearable technology and we’re aiming to offer additional products while continuing to have MonBaby benefit existing and future users.”

If you start with an observed problem and reverse engineer the solution, you’ll have an innovative idea that meets real world needs. That means you’re not just coming up with creative ideas for their own sake–you’re actually building a better world. It sounds heroic, but it could be as simple as your product making babies safer at night, and allowing new parents to get just a little more rest.

Expanding Technology Creates the Opportunity to Innovate

Baby safety tech is an expanding market, thanks to the way technology has changed how we interact and move through our daily lives. But the ability to innovate in a market like this will be reserved for those who have a keen eye for real world, solvable problems.
Incidentally, the MonBaby team is already at work on something to solve another of life’s major burdens–your partner’s snoring! With a similar wearable button, this one called the MonZzz, lets you electrocute your partner from your smartphone when they snore. It appears innovation is making us all sleep a little easier!

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EU Drafting Rules to Protect Technology From Foreign Takeovers – Bloomberg

Technology

EU Drafting Rules to Protect Technology From Foreign Takeovers – Bloomberg

European Union regulators are drafting rules to protect European firms with “key technologies” from foreign takeovers, EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said.

“We’ve heard concerns about foreign — often state-owned — investors taking over European companies that control key technologies,” she said in a speech at the Ambrosetti Forum in Cernobbio, Italy. “This issue isn’t simple. It needs careful consideration before we decide how to act. We’re working on this issue now, and we plan to put forward concrete proposals in the autumn.”

Germany put similar rules in place in July, which would allow the government to block foreign acquisitions of cutting-edge technology. The law was drawn up after China’s Midea Group Co. bid for robot maker Kuka AG last year, prompting the German economy minister to call for a European suitor to make a counterbid. The deal was later finalized without any German or EU intervention.

While the EU’s powerful merger regulators have the final say on whether most big deals would affect competition, European governments can jump in to halt deals that affect key national interests such as defense, energy, financial stability or security.

Vestager said in July that she had “relatively few concerns” about how governments use exemptions and their concern over technology deals was “completely legitimate.” It was important to keep merger control “clean” of these issues, she said.

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The Art Of Using Technology To Build Better Golf Courses – Forbes

Technology

The Art Of Using Technology To Build Better Golf Courses – Forbes

Veteran golf course architect Paul Albanese is walking the grounds at his upcoming Sage Run Golf Club in Hannahville, Mich. It’s a cool, rainy late August morning in the Upper Peninsula, so the 50-ish Ivy Leaguer is decked out in work boots, khakis and a light jacket. Part of the Island Resort & Casino, Sage Run will officially open for play next June and is located four miles from the hotel and its nine-year-old, highly acclaimed Sweetgrass Golf Club that Albanese also designed. “These are two of my babies,” he says. “But they’re entirely different golf experiences. I liken them to a red wine and a white wine.” As he should. Because so much time has passed between the design process of each course, the technology Albanese used for each job has drastically changed. How so?

Scott Kramer

Architect Paul Albanese stands by what will be the 2nd green at the upcoming Sage Run GC in Hannahville, Mich.

How does GPS help you get a better design?

PA: Design is all about tweaking an iteration and making changes. In the old days when we had to stake things out with tape measures and wheels, it would take a long time to make a change and see how it looked on paper — in comparison to what you just staked in the field. With GPS now, I literally can tap my phone and say ‘this is where I’m at, this is where I think the 8th tee should be’ and I can text it to my associate in the office who makes the change in real time and texts me back an image of what the hole would look like. It’s instantaneous feedback using GPS, and the time saved in not only initially staking out the course but being able to make changes and adjustments using GPS versus stakes is an incredible advantage to creating a better golf course. Staking out 18 holes by hand would take two-to-three days, and in some cases longer if it was wooded and we had to get the stakes through woods. By comparison, we were able to stake out the upcoming Sage Run in half a day.

Do you factor in the sun?

Software lets us analyze whether holes will have the sun in your face or not. It maps out from from space where the sun will be at any time of the year and day. My associates and I map the points and say here’s where we want the 9th hole, and then map out the sun path that shows us where it will be in relation to that tee shot for every day of the year. So we can tell early spring if golfers might have the sun in their eyes on the final hole, for example. We’re able to analyze exactly what golf architects have been trying to do for years, and we used to do it in a more general way. A general rule of thumb some 20 years ago or even 10 years ago was don’t tee off into the east and don’t finish into the west. But using technology, we’re now able to tweak that and know what is east exactly. Can it be 20 degrees north of east, if the hole is 23 degrees south of east? There’s all this different tweaking we can do, to know if a golfer’s gonna be heading into the sun or not, and whether it would actually preclude you from making a good golf hole there. And in fact, that’s what we did at Sage Run here. We originally and cautiously had a hole finishing to the west. But after doing sun analysis, we realized that although it was west, it was slightly southwest, and that for the majority of the summer the sun was going to be southeast. So golfers won’t be hitting into the sun like we assumed they would. That actually turns out to be our final hole now, and is a much better hole. Without that technology, we may have not finished and designed this course the way we did, which I think is a superior way to do it.

“>

Veteran golf course architect Paul Albanese is walking the grounds at his upcoming Sage Run Golf Club in Hannahville, Mich. It’s a cool, rainy late August morning in the Upper Peninsula, so the 50-ish Ivy Leaguer is decked out in work boots, khakis and a light jacket. Part of the Island Resort & Casino, Sage Run will officially open for play next June and is located four miles from the hotel and its nine-year-old, highly acclaimed Sweetgrass Golf Club that Albanese also designed. “These are two of my babies,” he says. “But they’re entirely different golf experiences. I liken them to a red wine and a white wine.” As he should. Because so much time has passed between the design process of each course, the technology Albanese used for each job has drastically changed. How so?

Scott Kramer

Architect Paul Albanese stands by what will be the 2nd green at the upcoming Sage Run GC in Hannahville, Mich.

How does GPS help you get a better design?

PA: Design is all about tweaking an iteration and making changes. In the old days when we had to stake things out with tape measures and wheels, it would take a long time to make a change and see how it looked on paper — in comparison to what you just staked in the field. With GPS now, I literally can tap my phone and say ‘this is where I’m at, this is where I think the 8th tee should be’ and I can text it to my associate in the office who makes the change in real time and texts me back an image of what the hole would look like. It’s instantaneous feedback using GPS, and the time saved in not only initially staking out the course but being able to make changes and adjustments using GPS versus stakes is an incredible advantage to creating a better golf course. Staking out 18 holes by hand would take two-to-three days, and in some cases longer if it was wooded and we had to get the stakes through woods. By comparison, we were able to stake out the upcoming Sage Run in half a day.

Do you factor in the sun?

Software lets us analyze whether holes will have the sun in your face or not. It maps out from from space where the sun will be at any time of the year and day. My associates and I map the points and say here’s where we want the 9th hole, and then map out the sun path that shows us where it will be in relation to that tee shot for every day of the year. So we can tell early spring if golfers might have the sun in their eyes on the final hole, for example. We’re able to analyze exactly what golf architects have been trying to do for years, and we used to do it in a more general way. A general rule of thumb some 20 years ago or even 10 years ago was don’t tee off into the east and don’t finish into the west. But using technology, we’re now able to tweak that and know what is east exactly. Can it be 20 degrees north of east, if the hole is 23 degrees south of east? There’s all this different tweaking we can do, to know if a golfer’s gonna be heading into the sun or not, and whether it would actually preclude you from making a good golf hole there. And in fact, that’s what we did at Sage Run here. We originally and cautiously had a hole finishing to the west. But after doing sun analysis, we realized that although it was west, it was slightly southwest, and that for the majority of the summer the sun was going to be southeast. So golfers won’t be hitting into the sun like we assumed they would. That actually turns out to be our final hole now, and is a much better hole. Without that technology, we may have not finished and designed this course the way we did, which I think is a superior way to do it.

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Technology Moves to the Head of the 21st Century Classroom – MIT Technology Review

Technology

Technology Moves to the Head of the 21st Century Classroom – MIT Technology Review

Residents of Diepsloot, a township in Johannesburg, South Africa, live in poverty —many in shacks without electricity and running water. Yet every morning, a select group of students hustles off to the non-profit LEAP  Science and Maths  School to soak up a rigorous curriculum of science, math, English, and 21st century digital skills courtesy of a high-tech collaboration to empower mobile classrooms.

In partnership with the VMware Foundation’s Good Gigs Service Learning program  , the LEAP (Language Enrichment Arts Program ) school built out a robust IT backbone and mobile computing lab while enabling a new curriculum based on digital learning and immersive content. Students who once lacked access to modern-day digital tools are now fully exploiting the Internet, interactive apps, online courses, and computing technology as part of their daily lessons, opening doors to new opportunities and a promising future.

The potent combination of globalization and digital transformation is upending the requirements for tomorrow’s workforce, underscoring the need for programs like the VMware-powered curriculum at the LEAP school. Such digital learning initiatives shift emphasis away from rote book- and lecture-style teaching to interactive experiences focused on collaboration, personalized content, and hands-on problem solving. The ability to leverage core IT infrastructure such as virtualized servers, networking, and storage, in concert with mobile technology, enables students in remote communities from Diepsloot to rural America to participate in digital learning experiences to which they previously had no access.

“It’s really about creating opportunities for students and teachers,” says Jessamine Chin, director of the VMware Foundation, who participated in the Good Gigs Trek with LEAP Science and Maths School. “We see that digital learning is really changing the way classrooms operate. Technology gives students and teachers [in less developed areas] access to the same kinds of opportunities that people in more urban settings tend to have access to.”

“We see that digital learning is really changing the way classrooms operate. Technology gives students and teachers [in less developed areas] access to the same kinds of opportunities that people in more urban settings tend to have access to.”

Jessamine Chin, Director, VMware Foundation

New learning prototypes are critical as the accelerated pace of change disrupts traditional business models and creates new 21st century jobs that demand different skill sets. According to a World Economic report, 35 percent of core workplace skills will change between 2015 and 2020, with complex problem solving, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration in high demand. At the same time, the report found that 65 percent of children entering primary school today will end up working in jobs that don’t currently exist, underscoring the need for new skills training using hands-on and exploratory learning techniques.  

Current instructional approaches are no match for the new skill sets because they fall short in their ability to engage students, foster retention, and apply learning to real-life scenarios, research found. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, among other noted think tanks, touts next-generation learning paradigms as the future of education and the best means to teach new digital-age skills. Specifically, the foundation says technology-driven learning practices deliver a variety of benefits, including access to high quality, relevant content in multiple forms; support for flexible class time and structure; diagnostic tools for directing the pace and format of individualized instruction; and the ability to reach out to those who have been historically underserved.

Technology-Enabled Learning

Next-generation learning models will rely heavily on technologies like VMware’s cloud and software-defined data center portfolios. Such platforms deliver the on-demand computing, storage, and network horsepower and anytime, anywhere access demanded by such new teaching approaches as Massive Open Online Classrooms (MOOCs), simulation, and virtual reality instruction, among other forms of connected learning. Such learning methods don’t just benefit disadvantaged students. While these technologies can help level the field in terms of educating students in remote and impoverished areas, they can also raise the bar for students in wealthier urban and suburban areas, as well as being leveraged to transform corporate training applications.

Popular consumer tools like smartphones and handheld tablets, in combination with Web services and mobile apps, will support new types of learning styles and educational content, including game-like instruction, 3D simulations, and augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) experiences. These new technologies plunge students into the subject matter and encourage a level of hands-on discovery that isn’t possible with traditional classroom instruction.

Emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, machine learning, and big data analytics will raise the bar even higher, allowing educators to personalize content to meet an individual student’s needs while serving up metrics to ensure specific goals are met. Using such digital experiences to complement traditional classroom learning is particularly critical for helping at-risk students achieve significant gains, according to a report from the Alliance for Excellent Education and the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education.

Digital Learning at Work

For the LEAP school in Diepsloot, mobile technology labs and new digital instructional experiences are already doing wonders to improve students’ quality of life and empower them to pursue professional and community service paths that were once the stuff of dreams. Graduates of the VMware-backed collaboration expect to become teachers, activists, and business owners, giving back to their communities and helping to lift up the economy of South Africa. VMware Good Gigs Trekkers researched relevant software and digital content to help devise the next-generation curriculum, training more than 30 LEAP teachers to expand the use of computer technology in the classroom, particularly for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) topics. In addition, the Good Gigs team helped train the LEAP school IT manager in the VMware infrastructure technologies, including new storage capacity and backup and recovery capabilities.

“Free from administrative paperwork, teachers can spend more one-on-one time to personalize learning for students,” Chin explains. “For students, there’s an ability to expand their mindsets and widen their worlds without having to travel.”

Closer to home, 48 states and the District of Columbia are also supplementing traditional classroom-style instruction with virtual and online learning, while a variety of states, charter schools, and private companies are providing access to online schools as a learning alternative for K-12 students. At a higher level, there is a growing number of open educational resources, including well-known MOOCs such as Khan Academy. In addition, universities including MIT are offering online options and intensive supplemental materials to assist students in the genre of MITx, an online learning platform where faculty can author interactive tests, post videos, and create virtual lab work.

There are also efforts underway to combine online capabilities with intensive instruction to allow students to benefit from hands-on learning for particularly complex subject matter—for example, in the sciences. Amino Labs, a startup hailing from the MIT Media Lab, is taking this approach to engage K-8 students in complex STEM topics such as synthetic biology and bioengineering. Co-founder Julie Legault, an MIT graduate, herself had trouble digesting this subject matter through traditional books and online courses. This experience motivated Legault to come up with a better teaching mechanism as part of her thesis research and post-graduate work. Her solution: Amino Labs’ series of award-winning biology minilabs and kits that take a learn-by-doing approach to encourage exploration and innovation. The kits, which Legault and crew liken to “Easy-Bake ovens” for biotechnology, come with everything students need to engineer bacteria, make fragrances, and play around with DNA—all practical exercises that allow them to develop an intimate understanding of these complex topics.

“Now folks who might not like science class have something they can enjoy and see that STEM has really creative applications.”

Julie Legault, Co-founder, Amnio Labs

“We wanted to make it into something everyone can be inspired with … so using colors and fragrances touches the emotional and artistic side of students and non-scientists,” Legault says. “Now, folks who might not like science class have something they can enjoy and see that STEM has really creative applications.”

While the current generation of Amino kits stand alone, the company sees cloud infrastructure and mobile apps in its future. These tools could be useful in enhancing application-based and open-source learning by harnessing computer horsepower to process vast amounts of experiment data or to facilitate supplementary 3D simulation and AR/VR experiences, Legault says.

Even without that cloud-based component, Michael Hirsch, science teacher and lab manager at the Acera School in Winchester, Mass., credits the Amino Labs kits and hands-on instruction as a game-changer for encouraging students to enthusiastically embrace complex topics like molecular biology. While most of the experiments are fairly simple and not flashy—for example, adding small amounts of liquid to different small amounts of liquid—the results have been impressive, he says. It’s too early for quantifiable results, but Hirsch says use of the CRISPR DNA starter kit, for example, engaged students by connecting a newsworthy topic with hands-on exploration, making the gene-editing technique part of their everyday discussions.

“I think that in order to really understand what cells are capable of doing, students have to experiment with them and learn the subtleties of the science,” Hirsch explains. “For so many, science feels stodgy, but it’s so much more vibrant than that. It is so cool to see students talking about science like it’s video games or Pokemon, and I think that the kits are integral to making these advanced concepts seem more relatable.”

Whether it’s hands-on kits or connected learning experiences, these new learning methods are helping to bridge the digital divide while also becoming a critical force for prepping workers for a continuously evolving digital future. Says VMware’s Chin: “In addition to enabling opportunities and access to information, digital learning also ensures students’ skill sets are more equally matched to the needs of the workforce, given that technology changes so rapidly .”

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Pure Storage Is Undervalued – Cramer's Lightning Round (8/31/17)

Finances

Pure Storage Is Undervalued – Cramer's Lightning Round (8/31/17)

Stocks discussed on the Lightning Round segment of Jim Cramer’s Mad Money Program, Thursday, August 31.

Bullish Calls

Pure Storage (NYSE:PSTG): The company had a good quarter, and the stock is still undervalued.

Boeing (NYSE:BA): It’s a multi-year story. Buy some at the current price and some when it declines.

Activision Blizzard (NASDAQ:ATVI): It will benefit from eSports. Cramer’s trust is building a position in it as well.

Humana (NYSE:HUM): Humana is a buy, but UnitedHealth Group (NYSE:UNH) is even better.

Hawaiian Holdings (NASDAQ:HA): It’s a good buy, but Cramer prefers Southwest Airlines (NYSE:LUV).

Apollo Global Management (NYSE:APO): “CEO Leon Black does well. I like KKR, too – I think that’s a good one. I also like Blackstone (NYSE:BX).”

Neutral Call

The Medicines Company (NASDAQ:MDCO): Cramer said he needs to work on it to opine.

Bearish Calls

Chesapeake Energy (NYSE:CHK): “You’ve got to hope for a cold winter. We did not get the summer that they needed to be able to get the thermostat going so that people would buy it. And don’t forget, the oil patch is no place to be right now.”

Under Armour (NYSE:UAA): Cramer noted he does not want to be in the sports apparel group.

For Mad Money segment, click here

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Stock Picking In Fantasy Football Style – Cramer's Mad Money (8/31/17)

Finances

Stock Picking In Fantasy Football Style – Cramer's Mad Money (8/31/17)

Stocks discussed on the in-depth session of Jim Cramer’s Mad Money TV Program, Thursday, August 31.

“It’s time for me to show my reality, not fantasy, but reality stock team, the one I drafted in my head last night while I was busily putting together what could be a championship Skidaddy Ski team, which, of course, competes in the Mad Money Schlumpadicka league,” said Cramer. He picked stocks in fantasy football style.

At the quarterback is Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL). It is one of the greatest consumer products company. For fleet-footed players who aren’t afraid of some traffic have equivalents as Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), Netflix (NASDAQ:NFLX) and Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA). These three stocks are one of a kind. There is hardly any competition for Amazon, Netflix’s model is unique and Nvidia is red hot as it is present in video games, autonomous cars and AI.

For the running backs, he picked Facebook (NASDAQ:FB) and Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG). These stocks might seem overvalued now but investors will not regret paying for them later. For the defense play, he picked the strongest stock in Dow Jones – Boeing (NYSE:BA). For the tight end he picked UnitedHealth (NYSE:UNH).

Kicker draft needs a consistent player like Visa (NYSE:V). For the bench, he’d pick Alibaba (NYSE:BABA) as a back-up quarterback, and Celgene (NASDAQ:CELG), Autodesk (NASDAQ:ADSK), 3M (NYSE:MMM) and Honeywell (NYSE:HON) as additional flex players.

“As you can see, this is a team that’s built for the ages, not just built for the season,” he concluded.

CEO interview – Ingevity (NYSE:NGVT)

Ingevity has a good last quarter. Their stock is up 150% since IPO. Cramer interviewed Michael Wilson to know what lies ahead.

Wilson said asphalt additives business will be at full potential during Texas rebuilding. Their products make road building faster and can be done at low temperatures.

Talking about purchase of

improvesthe pine chemicals business from Georgia Pacific, Wilson said they take byproducts from renewable raw materials and distill it which can be used in adhesives, cleaners, paints and more. Just like other deals, this will help the company grow organically.

Ingevity will get bigger when oil prices improve. “I mean, we’re only a $1B company today with about a $3B enterprise value, but we believe we’ve got a great, organic growth story, and on top of that, we do believe there are a number of acquisitions out there that can create a lot of value for our shareholders,” he concluded.

FMC Corp (NYSE:FMC)

The stock of FMC is up 50% YTD. “From the beginning, ever since I started recommending FMC, I’ve argued that this is an overlooked company with a stock that simply doesn’t get the respect it deserves from Wall Street. Even after its recent run, that’s still true,” said Cramer.

They have two segments -agriculture chemicals business and a lithium business that makes materials for rechargeable batteries. The lithium business accounts for only 10% of overall business and yet the company is announcing a spinoff of by 2018.

For their agri business, they are swapping some assets with DuPont (NYSE:DD) which will be better for FMC. The stock trades at 17 times earnings despite the positives. “Just because FMC’s stock has climbed relentlessly higher, that doesn’t mean you’ve missed a thing. I’m not kidding. There’s a lot of value creation still to come. If you don’t already own FMC, I suggest waiting for the next big market-wide pullback, and then do some buying,” concluded Cramer.

Viewer calls taken by Cramer

Enbridge (NYSE:ENB): Cramer prefers Magellan Midstream Partners.

Valeant Pharma (NYSE:VRX): It’s getting better but has limited upside for some time.

Ferrari (NYSE:RACE): “If they do the numbers, it’s not that expensive.”

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